THIS DATE IN NY GIANTS HISTORY: JUNE 26, 1934, 1944, & 1946

June 26, 1934
Giants’ pitcher Carl Hubbell notches his 200th victory as the Giants defeat the Cubs, 5-1. (Nationalpastime.com)

June 26, 1944
At the Polo Grounds with over 50,000 fans looking on, the New York major league teams play against each other in a six inning three-team game (a team played consecutive innings against the other two teams then sat out an inning). The contest, which was played to raise money for war bonds, ends with the final score of Dodgers 5, Yankees 1, Giants 0. (Nationalpastime.com)

June 26, 1946
Mel Ott retires as a player but continues his job as Giants manager. (Nationalpastime.com)
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THIS DATE IN NY GIANTS HISTORY: JUNE 24, 1950

June 24, 1950
Giants’ catcher Wes Westrum, a low average, high power defensive catcher, hits three home runs and a triple. The 27-year old backstop’s fifteen total bases help New York defeat Cincinnati at the Polo Grounds, 12-2. (Nationalpastime.com)

June 24, 1950
Willie Mays makes his professional baseball debut playing centerfield for Trenton, the Giants’ farm team in the Class B Inter State League. The 20-year old outfielder from Alabama goes hitless in the game against Hagerstown in Maryland, but will hit .353 in 81 games, before being promoted to the Minneapolis Millers, the Triple A affiliate of the parent club. (Nationalpastime.com)

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NYGPS MEETING WITH AUTHOR OF 1921:THE YANKEES, THE GIANTS, AND THE BATTLE FOR BASEBALL SUPREMACY IN NEW YORK, STEVE STEINBERG-REVIEW


This past Wednesday (11/8), the NYGPS conducted its final meeting of the calendar year with the author of 1921:The Yankees, the Giants, and the Battle for Baseball Supremacy in New York Steve Steinberg. Steinberg spoke of the battle between the kings of NY baseball with emphasis on two of the series main combatants and characters, John McGraw and Babe Ruth. A great Q/A then took place. Thanks to Steve and Jay Goldberg, owner of the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse, for a wonderful and informative evening!!!

LAST NYGPS MEETING OF 2017 WITH AUTHOR STEVE STEINBERG-11/8/17


Our last meeting of the calendar year will take place Wednesday, November 8th at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse at 6:30PM. Author Steve Steinberg will be our guest speaker. Steve will talk about his 2010 book 1921: The Yankees, the Giants, and the Battle for Baseball Supremacy in New York
https://www.amazon.com/1921-Yankees-Giants-Baseball-Supremacy/dp/0803239998

His chat will focus mainly on McGraw and the Giants.
Here is a brief synopsis:
The Yankees won their first pennant in 1921, and the World Series against the Giants was a struggle that pitted the slugging Babe Ruth (with his 59 home runs) against the legendary Giants manager John McGraw, who had the allegiance of most NY sports fans until that time. It was also a thrilling Series, with much drama and many surprises.

Please RSVP ASAP

If you would like a book, please let me know as well. All the best, Gary

NYGPS MEETING WITH PAUL KOCAK: OCTOBER 24

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Before a large audience at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse in lower Manhattan, the NYGPS held its final meeting of 2016. Paul Kocak discussed his book, Chasing Willie Mays.
https://www.amazon.com/Chasing-Willie-Mays-Pa…/…/ref=sr_1_1…
Kocak spoke about the book for about 35 minutes before entertaining questions from the audience. Kocak told us of his admiration and lifelong “seeking out” of his favorite player despite the Giants leaving his state and moving 3000 miles away. We want to thank Paul and Jay Goldberg (Owner of the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse) http://www.bergino.com/ for a wonderful evening!

‘WILLIE MAYS WORLD SERIES MVP’: MLB RENAMES AWARD, HONORS SAY HEY KID

By John Shea

In 1954, the year Willie Mays made his epic Game 1 catch at the Polo Grounds in New York, the most replayed highlight in World Series history, there was no World Series most valuable player award.
The first World Series MVP was awarded in 1955 to the Dodgers’ Johnny Podres.
Now, the award will be named after the great Mays, starting this season — the Willie Mays World Series most valuable player award.
“I think that’s a great honor,” Mays said in a phone interview. “It’s an ongoing thing. You never know who’s going to win the World Series or the World Series MVP. Every year, it’s somebody different. This is a wonderful honor.”

Commissioner Rob Manfred made the announcement Friday on the 63rd anniversary of Mays’ over-the-shoulder catch (and magnificent whirling throw to the infield) that robbed Vic Wertz and created momentum for a four-game sweep of the favored Cleveland Indians.
“Major League Baseball is thrilled to honor Willie Mays on our game’s biggest stage and in a manner that befits his many contributions to the sport … This annual recognition will forever celebrate the life and career of a legend of the national pastime,” Manfred said.
Mays issued a statement thanking Manfred and MLB and added, “Baseball has always taken care of me, and for that I am grateful. I think it’s just a wonderful thing to know that at 86 years of age, I can still give something back to the game. I am proud to lend my name to this important award. What a day this has been.”
Also Friday, Mays had a street named after him near the Polo Grounds site in New York. The northeast corner of 155th Street and Harlem River Drive now is Willie Mays Drive.
The Giants have had three World Series MVPs: Edgar Renteria in 2010, Pablo Sandoval in 2012 and Madison Bumgarner in 2014. Last year’s MVP was the Cubs’ Ben Zobrist.
“That’s a really cool honor for him and for all of us to see the MVP named after him,” manager Bruce Bochy said. “It’s going to remind people who Willie is and how great a player he was. I’m sure the player who receives the award, it’s going to mean a lot to him, having an award named after Willie Mays.”
Mays, 86, played in three World Series with the Giants (1951, 1954, 1962) and one with the Mets (1973). He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1979, voted by fans as one of the four greatest living players in a 2015 promotion and received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Obama.
John Shea is The San Francisco Chronicle’s national baseball writer. Email: jshea@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @JohnSheaHey

THE GIANTS GO WEST: THE TALE OF WHEN THE GIANTS LEFT NEW YORK AND HOW IT CHANGED BASEBALL


https://www.si.com/…/2017/09/28/new-york-giants-polo-grounds
HARRY SWARTOUT
Thursday September 28th, 2017
New York is a two-team town Giants-Jets, Knicks-Nets, Yankees-Mets but it hasn’t always been. In the Golden Age of Baseball, New York had three teams, all championship-caliber, in the Yankees, Giants and Dodgers.
Since 1883, the New York Giants had played ball in Manhattan (and in the Polo Grounds since 1911), but the stadium was getting old, and the city was changing. In 1957, Horace Stoneham decided to move the team west along with the Brooklyn Dodgers, absolutely gutting New York baseball fans.
The Giants moved and prospered, but the fans they left behind have been reckoning their love for a home team 300 miles away.
HARRY SWARTOUT
Thursday September 28th, 2017
New York is a two-team town Giants-Jets, Knicks-Nets, Yankees-Mets but it hasn’t always been. In the Golden Age of Baseball, New York had three teams, all championship-caliber, in the Yankees, Giants and Dodgers.
Since 1883, the New York Giants had played ball in Manhattan (and in the Polo Grounds since 1911), but the stadium was getting old, and the city was changing. In 1957, Horace Stoneham decided to move the team west along with the Brooklyn Dodgers, absolutely gutting New York baseball fans.
The Giants moved and prospered, but the fans they left behind have been reckoning their love for a home team 300 miles away.
https://www.si.com/…/2017/09/28/new-york-giants-polo-grounds

CITY HONORS BASEBALL’S NEW YORK GIANT WILLIE MAYS WITH STREET RENAMING IN HARLEM


By Shannan Ferry
City officials celebrate the life of a baseball legend by pitching up a permanent tribute. NY1’s Shannan Ferry was there and has the story from Harlem.
A lot has changed in Harlem since the 1950’s — it’s been sixty years since the New York Giants called this neighborhood home.
But on Friday, city officials honored the past — and one man in particular, renaming the corner of West 155th Street and The Harlem River Drive after Willie Mays, the baseball great who began his career with the Giants at the nearby Polo Grounds — and lived in the neighborhood, too.
“I mean how many guys brought a World Series, to Harlem?!” asked Jacob Morris, director of the Harlem Historical Society.
The ceremony came on the 63rd anniversary of a magic Mays moment.
His iconic over-the-shoulder catch in Game One of the 1954 World Series against the Cleveland Indians at the Polo Grounds.
The ‘Say Hey’ kid spent six years with the Giants here through the 1957 season, then moved with the team to San Francisco, where he played until ending his career back in New York with the Mets in 1973.
His son Michael Mays says he and his dad who is 86 are thrilled by this honor, because Harlem is where it all began.
“You can’t beat the pride,” the younger Mays said. “He’s a person in history, he’s a significant person, he’s in the white house, and a medal of honor, I mean the achievements in his life, it’s incredible.”
Organizers say they hope the street sign also inspires the younger generation. Some young players we spoke with say seeing it right here in Harlem, makes them even more motivated.
“Now just want to be like him, especially I’m an outfielder he was an outfielder, so that inspired me to look at videos and try to be like him,” said Wanter Martin, a high school junior.
This is not the only new honor for Mays. Major League Baseball announced Friday that the World Series MVP award will be named the “Willie Mays World Series Most Valuable Player.”
And from this ceremony near the old Polo Grounds, it is clear Mays is still an MVP to Harlem.
http://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/news/2017/09/29/city-honors-new-york-giant-willie-mays-with-street-renaming-in-harlem.html

NOW MORE THAN HOMEPLATE PLAQUE AND BRUSH STAIRWAY TO VISIT AT THE POLO GROUNDS SITE



A three-section mural of the fabled Polo Grounds site was officially dedicated today, August 30, at the Polo Grounds Towers at 2931 8th Avenue in Upper Manhattan. The mural, “Illustrates the story of the Polo Grounds housing development’s past, present, and future, including the Polo Ground’s rich sports history as the location of the NY Giants fabled field.” The project was spearheaded by Groundswell www.groundswell.nyc, an organization that “Brings together artists, youth, and community organizations through the Scaffold Up! model to use art as a tool for social change, for a more just and equitable world. Projects beautify neighborhoods, engage youth in societal and personal transformation, and give expression to ideas and perspectives that are underrepresented in the public dialogue”. Claudie Mabry and Robyne Walker Murphy, spoke on behalf of the Groundswell group. Remarks were then made by former Polo Grounds Towers tenant leader Barbara Williams and Property Manager Clara Garcia, as well as the President of the NYGPS. Lead Artist Demetrius Felder and Assistant Artist Iris Loughran then closed out the ceremony thanking everyone including their hard-working artists!!

Pictured are members Carmine Magazino, Paul Ellis-Graham, Tim Penman, and Gary Mintz