WILLIE MAYS TURNS 84, MAY 6

MAYS 24
Happy Birthday to the greatest from the NYGPS!!! Long may your cap fly off running the bases, long may you chase down balls in the gap and over your head, long may the ball fly off your bat and land over the wall, long may our memories of your greatness continue!!! Happy 84!!!

NYGPS 3RD MEETING OF THE YEAR!!-JUNE 8TH WITH ANDREW BAGGARLY

BAGGS
BAGGS BOOK 2
EXTRA BAGGS AT THE BERGINO CLUBHOUSE!!
Our 3rd meeting of the year (Trophy Tour, Jaime Rupert) will take place June 8 with Andrew Baggarly journalist, Jeopardy Champion, and author, who has covered the Giants since 2004. Andy has graciously agreed to speak to our group as the Giants come to town to play the Mets, June 9-11. Andy is the very talented Giants beat writer for the San Jose Mercury News. His twitter account is the 1st place Giants fans should go to when they need the latest on the Orange and Black. He is in my opinion, the best of all the Giants reporters and writers. Simply, he tells it like it is. Here is the link; this is must for serious Giants fans. https://twitter.com/extrabaggs along with his website http://andrewbaggarly.com/
Andy is the author of A Band of Misfits: Tales of the 2010 San Francisco Giants (2011) and Giant Splash: Bondsian Blasts, World Series Parades, and Other Thrilling Moments by the Bay (2015) Here is a blurb from Amazon about his newest book:
“Celebrate the golden age of San Francisco Giants baseball with Giant Splash, a firsthand account by Giants beat reporter and best-selling author Andrew Baggarly. Since the team moved to the shores of McCovey Cove in 2000, Giants fans have been thrilled by iconic players, historic moments, and heroic performances—not to mention three World Series championships. Giant Splash takes readers onto the field and inside the clubhouse for every unforgettable moment: Barry Bonds’ record-setting home runs, Tim Lincecum’s no-hitter, Matt Cain’s perfect game, Travis Ishikawa’s walk-off pennant winner, and many more.”
This will be a can’t miss event, especially for the majority of us who have remained Giants fans despite the fact that they moved 3,000 miles away, 57 years ago!!
I expect this to be a packed house at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse http://www.bergino.com/
RSVP as soon as possible and please indicate if you would like to purchase either book, or one or the other. Andy will be happy to sign your book. I met Andy at CitiField and he was nice enough to sign my Band of Misfits book, which is a fabulous read!!
Looking forward to seeing many of you on the 8th, we are looking at 6, or 6:30 starting time. I will advise when I’m sure.-Gary

THIS DATE IN NY GIANTS HISTORY: MAY 6, 1937

MAY 6, 1937
Dodgers and Giants fans attending afternoon ball games at both the Polo Grounds and Ebbets Field are thrilled to have the opportunity to catch a glimpse of the Hindenberg when it appears over New York nearing the end of its maiden voyage of the season from Germany. A few hours later, the majestic German zeppelin will explode on a landing strip in Lakehurst, N.J. killing 36 of its passengers.
(Nationalpastime.com)
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THIS DATE IN NY GIANTS HISTORY: MAY 2, 1928 & 1956

MAY 2, 1928
With the bases loaded and two out in the ninth inning, Giants’ manager John McGraw orders that Dodger rookie Del Bissonette be intentionally walked with the bases loaded by Larry Benton, forcing home a run. The strategy works when Harry Riconda strikes out giving New York a 2-1 victory in the Polo Grounds contest.
(Nationalpastime.com)

MAY 2, 1956
During a game in which 48 players see action, Chicago’s third baseman Don Hoak strikes out a record six times against six different New York pitchers. The Giants outlast the Cubs in the 17-inning Wrigley Field marathon, 6-5.
(Nationalpastime.com)
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JERSEY CITY’S HORACE STONEHAM BELONGS IN BASEBALL HALL OF FAME

STOEHAM LUCAS

JERSEY CITY’S HORACE STONEHAM BELONGS IN BASEBALL HALL OF FAME by Ed Lucas

In a tranquil, sunny corner of Jersey City’s Holy Name Cemetery, on West Side Avenue, you’ll find a memorial with the name “Stoneham.” Not many visitors stop by these days, but for local baseball fans, it’s a name that should ring out through the decades.
Charles Stoneham, who grew up in Newark and served as an altar boy at several Hudson County parishes, owned the New York Giants baseball club from 1919 until his death in 1936. He is buried in his family’s Jersey City plot. Under Stoneham’s watch, the NY Giants became a premiere team in the National League, winning the World Series in 1921, 1922 and 1933.
After Charles Stoneham’s death, his son, Horace, inherited the club. At just 32 years old in 1937, Horace became the youngest owner of a Major League baseball team.
One of the first things he did was to establish a successful minor league Giants franchise in Jersey City, at Roosevelt Stadium, keeping the family’s connections to Hudson County strong. This also ensured generations of Giants fans in Jersey City, many of whom still root for them.
Both versions of the Giants were winners under Horace, who worked in several capacities, including as de facto general manager. He kept them at or near the top of the league.
Unfortunately, attendance at the Polo Grounds and in Jersey City was declining by the 1950s. Fans just stopped showing up, even though both clubs actually won titles in the 40’s and 50’s.
For other owners, this wouldn’t be a major crisis, but for Stoneham it was a disaster. The Giants were his primary business. They were the sole income stream for his family. Fewer tickets sold meant a dip in personal fortunes.
In 1951, the Jersey City club relocated to Ottawa, Canada. The city of New York wasn’t offering assistance in updating the Polo Grounds, either, so Stoneham began looking for a new home for the big club.
Realizing the potential for western expansion in baseball, Horace first explored a move to Minnesota. When that fell through, he was courted by the mayor of San Francisco. He signed the deal to move the Giants to California in 1957, even before the Dodgers signed theirs. Continue reading

THIS DATE IN NY GIANTS HISTORY: APRIL 25, 1937

APRIL 25, 1937
Cliff Melton becomes to first rookie to fan at least 10 batters in his major league debut, finishing with 13 strikeouts in a complete-game loss to the Braves at the Polo Grounds. The 25-year old southpaw, who loses the contest due to the Giants poor defense in the ninth inning, will hold the rookie record for K’s in his debut until Dodger freshman Karl Spooner whiffs 15 batters in his first major league start in 1954.(Nationalpastime.com)
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