A GIANT NIGHT WITH JAIME RUPERT!!

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March 25 was the NYGPS first meeting of the 2015 year, excluding our January soiree with the World Series Trophy. Guest speaker Jaime Rupert spoke before an SRO crowd at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse. Jaime was fabulous speaking for almost 40 minutes about her life as the granddaughter of Horace Stoneham. She told us great tidbits regarding Stoneham’s love for the game and his GIANTS. She read an excerpt from her soon to be released book entitled Really? Really! and told us of her love affair with the game due to her relationship to the team.
Jaime then extolled the merits of her grandfather and how he is deserving of the Baseball Hall of Fame induction via the Golden Era Committee. Her points mainly being longevity, foreseeing baseball need to expand to the west coast, starting the Cactus League, being a forerunner of black integration to the game (starting the 1st all African-American outfield in NY), being a leader in the Hispanic movement in the game, etc. Whether you agreed with her or not, her points were all well taken and convincing to the point were members were changing their opinions on Stoneham’s election. Jaime hopes this might be the start of changing public opinion as she tries to gather steam for her dream.
I want to thank the over 40 members who showed up for a wonderful night. A special thanks to Jay Goldberg, owner of the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse for making his home ours! With Easter and Passover right around the corner, there is no better place to get the one of a kind baseball gift that Jay can offer. Check out his website athttp://www.bergino.com/

ED LOGAN SR., FORMER NY GIANTS CLUBHOUSE MANAGER, INDUCTED INTO THE CACTUS LEAGUE HALL OF FAME

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ED LOGAN JR
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A very special day was celebrated and enjoyed by the NYGPS on Feb 25 at the annual Cactus League luncheon held in Peoria, AZ, as Ed Logan Sr., father of our own Ed Logan Jr., was inducted into the Cactus League HOF, Class of 2015. Ed Logan Sr. was recognized for his extraordinary contributions to the NY and SF Giants as clubhouse manager during spring training each year in AZ from 1947 to his retirement in 1979.
Mr. Logan’s HOF plaque was presented to Ed Logan Jr., the last bat boy of the NY Giants and NYGPS Member, who graciously offered an insightful and at times humorous acceptance speech on behalf of his dad.
In attendance at the induction were key members of the extended and close-knit Giants family: Chris Durocher, son of Leo Durocher; Jaime Rupert, granddaughter of long-time former owner Horace Stoneham; Roy McKercher, the Giants 1st batboy in 1958, the team’s first year in SF; Steve Rothschild, Co-President of the NYGPS as well as other members of the NYGPS based in the Phoenix area.
Also, as this date was the 96th birthday of NY Giants HOF outfielder Monte Irvin, the NYGPS members phoned Monte as a group to extend him our best wishes.

Top Pix-Ed Logan Sr.
Middle Pix-Chris Durocher & Ed Logan Jr. with plaque of his dad’s achievements.
Bottom Pix-Ed Logan Jr. speaking about his dad.

THIS DATE IN NY GIANTS HISTORY: FEBRUARY 26, 1957

FEBRUARY 26, 1957
The Giants trade right-hander Hoyt Wilhelm to the Cardinals for their former all-star first baseman/outfielder Whitey Lockman. The knuckleballer will win only one of five decisions for the Redbirds before being selected off waivers by Cleveland in September, and New York’s newest infielder will spend two seasons with his old club hitting .246 in 225 games over that span.
(Nationalpastime.com)
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NYGPS MEETING-MARCH 25 WITH JAIME RUPERT

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Our second meeting of the year will take place on Wednesday, March 25, at 6:30, with the wonderful Jaime Rupert. Jaime will be telling stories of her life as part of the 1st family of NY Giants/SF Giants Baseball, being the granddaughter of Horace Stoneham. Besides her wonderful yarns, Jaime will be presenting her case for he grandfather’s election to the Baseball Hall of Fame. Mr. Stoneham will be up for election in 2017 and Jaime hopes to be in Cooperstown in July 2018 for his induction. Jaime will also be sporting her beautiful 1954 NY Giants World Series Ring which she displayed at the recent Giants Trophy Tour on January 24 where she made a most-welcomed appearance.
The event will take place at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse. In advance, I thank Jay for his continued support! If you need the perfect baseball gift, contact Jay at http://www.bergino.com/
Please RSVP ASAP!! Beginning March 1st, Jay will open it up to his “list”

THIS DATE IN NY GIANTS HISTORY: FEBRUARY 1, 1913 & 1973

FEBRUARY 1, 1913
Jim Thorpe signs with the New York baseball Giants. The Olympic hero will compile a life-time .252 batting average during his six seasons in the major leagues, which includes stints with the Reds and Braves.
(Nationalpastime.com)

FEBRUARY 1, 1973
Commissioner Bowie Kuhn announces the Special Committee on the Negro Leagues selection of Monte Irvin to the Hall of Fame. The outfielder spent five full seasons in the major leagues, and was the first black to play for the Giants.
(Nationalpastime.com)
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THIRD TIME’S ANOTHER CHARM

MAYS ENTERS
BY GREG PRINCE

From NYGPS Member and Mets Blogger (FAITH & FEAR IN FLUSHING) extraordinaire Greg Prince
A GREAT REVIEW OF THE EVENT!

http://www.faithandfearinflushing.com/2015/01/26/third-times-another-charm/

Is there any better antidote to chilly days than Willie Mays? Is there any doubt that No. 24 could melt the 24 inches of snow projected to blanket our Metropolitan Area if you gave him a bat, a glove and another go with 24-year-old legs? Is there a sunnier thought 24 days in advance of Pitchers & Catchers than that which results when one considers the greatest center fielder there ever was?
Say no to all of the above because, Say Hey, Willie Mays was in town over the weekend, reminding all of us lucky enough to spend a few minutes in his presence that greatness doesn’t grow old. It just gets better with age.
The Willie Mays I saw on Saturday was the Willie Mays who acts as ambassador for the game he made his own a scant 64 years ago. There are many Willie Mayses. Willie the phenom from 1951. Willie the megastar by 1954. Willie the idol of millions forever after. Willie from Uptown, when he lived around the corner from where he worked and played ball at both addresses (stickball on St. Nicholas Place, baseball on Eighth Avenue between 155th and 157th Streets). Willie of the West Coast after he was transferred on business. Willie who left his heart in New York and came back to find it well cared for in 1972. Willie who Said Goodbye to America two weeks before helping bid the Big Red Machine au revoir in the fall of 1973. Willie the living legend, in and out of uniform for decades since.
Yes, there are many Willie Mayses. But when you get right down to it, there’s only one Willie Mays.
The Giants — currently of San Francisco, ancestrally of Manhattan — keep coming up with good excuses to give Willie Mays a ride back to his baseball hometown. They keep winning the World Series. Not every year, which would be gauche, but every other year. Then they take a few days out of their busy California schedule and visit New York with a trophy and an icon in tow. The trophy’s a lovely keepsake, but it’s somebody else’s. When the Giants come around, I don’t greet them in order to relish their spoils of victory.
I come to be near Willie Mays. Success hasn’t spoiled that sensation.
To offer a little background to those of you who haven’t heard it before, I’ll tell you that at the age of nine, when I was already deeply and eternally bound to the fortunes of our Metsies, I became fully aware that they were preceded as “N.Y. (N.L.)” by another outfit, one that even wore the same NY on their caps. This was 1972. I was in third grade and had begun to soak up the history of those larger-than-life New York Giants. There was an article in Baseball Digest that introduced me to John McGraw and Christy Mathewson. There was a biography in the East School library that profiled Mel Ott. Suddenly, there was a trade made by the New York Mets that netted them the greatest of New York Giants. Continue reading